CONFERENCE PAPER

Divide and Conquer: Can We Handle Complex Markup Simply?

This paper describes how a divide-and-conquer approach might be used to handle the complex markup structure that results from recording multiple variants of an historical document in a single XML document.

Respecting cultural heritage to represent change

Cultural Heritage markup can quickly become complex because of the need to represent multiple, and even overlapping, hierarchical structures. It can therefore become very difficult to maintain correctly.

This talk suggests that a better approach is now possible: markup that is designed to represent different aspects of a text could be handled separately from the point of view of checking and maintenance, and then only combined into a single document when needed, e.g. for some kind of analysis. Advances in comparison and merge tools for XML make this a possibility.

Read this conference paper to:

  • Learn how to handle change throughout multiple versions of a document.
  • Understand how XML comparison tools can help to find change within cultural heritage markup.
  • Understand how XML merging tools can help re-combine change within cultural heritage markup.

Divide and Conquer: Can We Handle Complex Markup Simply?

Conference Paper

This paper describes how a divide-and-conquer approach might be used to handle the complex markup structure that results from recording multiple variants of an historical document in a single XML document.

One of the advantages of this approach would be that we would not need to keep all the variants together in a single document all the time, but rather we would combine only those variants that were relevant to a particular publishing scenario.

Related Media

The issue of how best to represent overlapping hierarchy in XML has been the topic of a number of papers over the years. This paper is a further contribution to this important issue but approaching the problem from a different direction.

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It’s common to have data in two files that we need to merge together, two different people or two different processes have made changes. Does it matter who or what has made this change? This question might help to decide whether you need a 2-way or 3-way merge.

A new approach to representing change in CALS tables

Our new CALS tables algorithm means complex change isn’t complicated to understand.