CONFERENCE PAPER

Merging XML files: A new approach providing intelligent merge of XML data sets

As XML becomes ubiquitous so the need for powerful tools to manipulate XML data becomes more pressing. As XML tools become more powerful, so the possibility of achieving a genuine, intelligent merge of XML data sets becomes a reality.

XML Merging Made Simple

Merging XML is particularly tricky, but often necessary to consolidate data feeds from heterogeneous systems, or to synchronise submissions of XML fragments which make up a larger document.

An automated mechanism for defining and controlling such merges has been developed and is demonstrated to provide a consistent, adaptable and resilient solution to this problem. Integration into an information pipeline allows limitless customisation.

Within this Conference Paper we:

  • Review the benefits of using a systematic approach to XML merging based on the use of an intermediate XML file that contains both of the files to be merged.
  • Learn how conflicts can be resolved when merging multiple XML versions.
  • Understand the issues of real data in terms of how to control the correct correspondence between the data within the files, which is a necessary step before a sensible merge can be executed.

Merging XML files: a new approach providing intelligent merge of XML data sets

Conference Paper

As XML becomes ubiquitous so the need for powerful tools to manipulate XML data becomes more pressing. As XML tools become more powerful, so the possibility of achieving a genuine, intelligent merge of XML data sets becomes a reality.

In order to understand the situations where a merge can be effective and where there are likely to be problems, it is useful to understand how the comparison process works.

Related Media

Merging XML documents is a particularly tricky operation but is often required to consolidate or synchronise two or more independent edit paths or versions. As XML tools become more powerful, the possibility of achieving an intelligent merge of XML data sets become reality.

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